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20121205
20121213
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
's the paranoia from the u.n. >> explain it. >> the notion that the u.n. is going to come in and tell us what to do. the fact of the matter is this treaty raises the world to the standard of the u.s. doesn't require the u.s. to change its standards at all and doesn't in any way give the u.n. power to do anything in this country. but i think it's -- all you have to do is say u.n. and people on the right get very exorcised. rick santorum helped lead the opposition to this treaty. i think he's out of step with the american people, out of step, by the way, on this tax cuts for the rich stuff. you know, bobby jindal said today, and i thought it was remarkable, we're in danger of becoming the party that defends the rich, anti-medicare, anti-social security, and there's no future in that kind of republican party nor is there one in a party that's anti-handicapped. >> let me go to john on this because you and i, john, i think we all know people in our business, in the journalism world, and in consulting who have handicaps. they are in wheelchairs, but they raise a ruckus effectively if there's some f
that don't want to do anything through the u.n. because come how they think that weakens our power as a country. i think they really cut off their nose to spite their face, and really forgone an opportunity to have our standard ada legislation set the standard globally for disabled people. and many disabled veterans. >> cenk: and every major veteran's gr
republicans voted no. >> to vote for anything that is even perceived to be granting the u.n. power is a dangerous game for a republican senator because the u.n. is so unpopular among the republican base. >> oh, my god. it's official. republicans hate the united nations more than they like helping people in wheelchairs. >> with us now from washington, nbc news chief white house correspondent and political director and host of "the daily rundown," chuck todd. with us here on the set, writer for "the national review" online, bob costa. robert, thank you so much for being with us today. >> good to join you. >> hey, chuck, so we're having a debate here. yesterday we had matt lewis, well-known conservative, guy that we really like, saying that john boehner was weaker than ever. "the new york times" today, not as well beloved in conservative circles, how boehner gained strong backing from the house gop. a lot of really good sources in there. what's your take on boehner's positioning right now? where does he stand compared to last year when he always felt like eric cantor was breathing dow
of the ringleaders in voting down the u.n. treaty for people with disabilities this week. >> that was one of the saddest days, so anyone who was a party to that, well, i wish them well wherever they are going and hope that we can have more of our values represented there. >> it was demint and his tea party allies who pushed the country to the brink of default back in 2011. this is what demint told abc news about republicans who tried to strike a debt deal. >> what happens if -- what happens to republicans who go along with a debt ceiling increase? if they go along with the debt ceiling increase without a balanced budget amendment and the kind of stuff you're talking about? >> i think for the most part they're gone. it would be the most toxic vote we could take. >> demint's far right ideology is a key reason nothing gets done in this congress. house speaker john boehner is currently being pressured by demint and his followers to refuse any debt deal with tax increases. demint was on rush limbaugh's radio show today with heritage president ed fulner. life isn't going to get any easier for j
humanitarian aid and other non- military support. the u.n. now estimates that half a million syrians have fled to neighboring countries with two million more displaced within syria itself. >> ifill: for more on the syrian political opposition i'm joined now by murhaf joujati, professor of middle east studies at the national defense university and a former member of the syrian national council, the last major syrian political opposition group. and fred hof, who served as secretary of state clinton's special adviser for the syrian transition until last september. he is now a senior fellow at the atlantic council. ambassador hof, i want to start with you. how significant is what the president said yesterday about this recognition? >> gwen, first of all, i'm delighted to be here. i think what the president had to say was extraordinarily significant. we're coming to the point now where we may be at or very close to a tipping point in syria. where the assad regime may be in serious jeopardy of going down. nevertheless, there are still millions, literally millions, of syrians on the fence. they have
's very hard to say when it is then his regime will collapse. host: the secretary general of the u.n., anders rasmussen, said that "it would be completely unacceptable for the whole international community and if anyone resort to these terrible weapons, i would expect an immediate reaction from the international community." what would that reaction be? guest: military intervention. we have heard very strong warnings. the words of not been directly spelled out, it's likely that is exactly what would need to happen. host: led by the u.s. or another nation? guest: the u.s. would clearly playing a leading role. host: front page of a "the new york times." the story points out the loan syrian rebel group with the stamp of approval from all qaeda has become one of the most effective fighting forces was a stark challenge to the u.s. and other countries. explain. guest: this is a longstanding concern and one reason why the obama administration has said they're not interested in sending sophisticated weapons and to syria. the organization referred to in the article is considered one of the mos
of mali, to our allies, and to our security. the u.n. security council is now considering what they call a concept of operations for an african-led military operation. the u.s. can and should play a more active role in supporting this and preventing the country from becoming a permanent home for extremists and a safe haven for terrorists. an active role, mr. president, does not mean putting american boots on the ground. instead, we can provide operational support for a regionally led, multilateral, african-led force being organized by eco was, the economic community of west african states, and the african union. in the weeks ahead, the u.n. security council will likely vote on a resolution authorizing this coalition to lead a military intervention to dislodge the terrorists in the northern. we've seen models like this wo work, in cote d'ivoire and somalia, so there's reason to believe in the potential of a regional military solution to the security crisis in the north. however, even if this intervention works, it will take time to train and equip and assemble the regional force and to de
who was wounded while serving our country in world war ii. watching the u.n. disability treaty pass in the senate where he spent 27 years of his life was to be the cap on his life as a great republican and a fine american. that's how they treat one of their own. plus a -- [ applause ] >> wow. >> stephanie: hello doris in kentucky. >> caller: hello steph. we live -- ashley judd is exploring the possibility of running for the seat of mitch mcconnell. >> stephanie: i think that's awesome. >> we couldn't be anymore excited. we're bursting at the seams. louisville is supporting it. i think what she said this morning is to see if -- to see the possibility. but we're -- trying to stay connected on the web and let her know we'll support her. we will start some progress of trying to get this man off of the senate. >> stephanie: yep absolutely. we will be all over that to eject the turtle from his terrarium in kentucky. >> send him back to the galapagos. >> stephanie: for smokin' hot actress ashley judd. we wer
in benghazi. take a listen. >> susan rice has done a great job as our u.n. ambassador. she has been a stalwart colleague in a lot of the tough decisions that we've had to make. and certainly with respect to defending our national interests and national security at the united nations. >> so clinton is also going to testify on benghazi next week. what are the politics of all of this for secretary clinton? and are there risks for her here? >> i don't think there are necessarily risks for her here as long as she stays out of the whole fray of susan rice and congressional republicans. there's an awful lot going on on that score, but i tnk hillary clinton may be able to keep herself above all that. by the way, we keep expecting the white house for this rice situation to be resolved. we fully expect president clinton to make -- excuse me, president obama to make his announcement about his national security team any day now. >> what do you hear with regards to that, david? are you hearing that susan race is going -- susan rice is going to get the nod or that the waters are shark infested and -- >> com
by attacking the u.s.? no. that was the reverse of what we would have faced if they had used the i.n.f. missiles to attack our allies in europe. we would be faced without the i. i.n.f. in europe to using our intercontinental and if effect committing suicide. so, everything was reversed by the deployment. i think what rick has said about the deployment is absolutely right. we had to deploy in order to show the soviets that their real interest was zero. now, of course, in reykjavik we were very close to agreeing and we have had agreed if gorbachev had not put conditions on 100 outside europe. whether we ever would have deployed 100 in alaska i doubt. but the problem from the russian point of view was that gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. and with 100 i.n.f. missiles directed at them how was he going to do that? it was not in their interests to have 100 missiles out of europe. and it was really in their interest. now we've access of records of politburo discussions. let me go back to a couple of words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev,
that there is no cohesive story here. >> pitts: last year, based on the new d.n.a. evidence and katie marie's work, the courts vacated the convictions and granted all of them certificates of innocence, which restored their full rights as u.s. citizens. as for anita alvarez, she's still not convinced terrill swift and his codefendants are innocent. >> alvarez: i don't know whether he committed the crime or not. there are still unanswered questions in both of these cases that i couldn't sit here today and tell you that they are all guilty or they are all innocent. >> pitts: what would you say to her if you could? >> swift: i was wrongfully incarcerated for 15 years and you're still fighting my innocence, not only mine but my co-defendants. what else needs to be done? >> pitts: during our interview, terrill's mother, who was in the room at the time, became emotional. i could hear you crying over there. why are you still shedding tears? >> mrs. swift: that was hard, actually have your child taken away from you and he was innocent. and i knew this from the beginning. but what could i do? not to be able
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)